Author: Gerald Ross

Garden and Fencing

We like to start by looking at the outside of the property and working out what can be done, even before we begin planning what to do with the interior.

Fencing and borders are an important part of the plan. Take a look at this fencing supplies and installation website to see some great photos of the difference nice fencing can make to the look of your property. I particularly like the little square picture that features a shed and a panel fence with a trellis along the top. It makes the garden look so neat and characterful.

There are so many types of fences that it’s crucial to choose something that will fit in with the use of your house and the neighbourhood. You wouldn’t want a panel fence to keep sheep in your field, for example, nor stock fencing around your front garden.  So pick something that suits the purpose of your property and the look.

For a town, we particularly like closeboard fencing to give privacy and a very neat finish. If you want it to be long-lasting without any maintenance problems, consider concrete posts and gravel boards. They work out a little more expensive but they won’t rot like wood. For a cheaper alternative that looks similar, you can go for panel fencing, with either wooden or concrete posts and boards. Some of these fit simply by just slotting into the posts, meaning you can replace one panel if it gets damaged.

A town front garden can look neat and pretty with a simple picket fence, which can be natural stained wood or painted to match or contrast with the house. A small matching gate will add the finishing touch.

A rural property may suit a panel fence or perhaps go for post-and-rail, which gives a more open look whilst still keeping out many stray animals. However, if you want to keep deer either in or out of your garden, you may have to consider bespoke deer fencing, since they are very good a jumping and squeezing through small spaces. Although they can be very pretty to watch, deer are pretty destructive if you have flower gardens or young trees.

Once you’ve chosen your fences, your boundaries will be secure and you can concentrate on planning your garden. It’s a great idea to call in a professional landscape gardener, even if it’s only to do a plan for you. It can be very difficult to picture how a garden will turn out when you’re looking at a bare patch of stones and weeds!

But some people do have that vision and we’ve seen some beautiful designs done by first-time amateurs, so by all means have a go yourself.

Of course the majority of the planting will have to wait until any interior gutting has been done, otherwise you’ll have workmen trampling your new plants and dumping rubble and sanitaryware all over your grass.

But once you get to that stage, you’ll be amazed at how transformational it is to see all the finishing outdoor touches in place. Don’t forget to add a corner where you can sit and contemplate the world and perhaps a beautiful patio or decking to bring the house and garden together. These days your garden can be seen as a natural extension of the house and be used on a daily basis, perhaps even incorporating an outdoor kitchen in milder areas.

Remember that your garden is there to be enjoyed just as much as the interior of your property, so it deserves just as much care and planning.